Humpty Dumpty Fell Off His Wall

 Humpty Dumpty is doomed to fall off its wall.
Will conviviality with Ryan glue it together at all?
All the King’s bigots and old white GOP men
have no choice but to like it, but can they pretend?

donald trump wall

The party is shattered, it will never be the same
The people are angry and it’s these men they blame
The people have spoken, we’re tired of life
being constantly lowered and filled with more strife

Your bank accounts swell with the money you’ve stolen
Our wallets are empty while yours are so swollen
American will never be quite the same
The GOP party won’t be old white men again

Nor the Clintons the Bushs or any plutacracy
No more parties of power where we play along willingly
The people have spoken, no matter what side
But It took a lunatic like Donald to open all eyes

To show us we don’t have to be so complacent
Create wars for profit with our kids for deployment
Both parties will change and we’ll write all new rules
No more lies and smokescreens that play us for fools

But if bigots and racists think they can hurt any people
or use God with his playbook when all people are equal
If you cause hate and suffering to those you don’t like
you’re no better than those who think they’re godlike

We have the chance, the power is ours
We can use it for better or we can leave scars
of a battle we can win if we don’t act so stupid
yelling names at each other with threats that we boasted.

We’re mad as hell; we’re not going to take it anymore
We need to work together and kick them right on out the door!

by Sonni Quick   copyright 2016

This 1956 guidebook for black travelers is an incredible reminder of America’s racist realities

………Interesting. I didn’t know something like this existed. I haven’t had a chance yet to read it, but I will be. If you are white, like I am, we cannot fathom what it is like to walk in the shoes of people who had to deal with situations that were not common for us.

HumanSinShadow.wordpress.com

Wayback Machine

This 1956 guidebook for black travelers is an incredible reminder of America’s racist realities

Courtesy of the University of South Carolina, South Caroliniana Library

During the Jim Crow era, traveling in the United States for African-Americans was difficult and often dangerous. Motels and restaurants didn’t have to serve you if they didn’t want to. “Sundown towns”—places where it was unsafe to be black at night—dotted the nation’s geography. If you were driving around the country, the only way to know if you were safe was by word-of-mouth.

But a black civic leader named Victor H. Green came up with a better, more permanent solution. In the early 1930s, he began publishing a compendium of tips…

View original post 220 more words

The City That Believed in Desegregation

This is a good website to follow if you’re interested in inequalities our the police state we’re headed to because we know now that the policeman is no longer our friend.

This post has, is about a good thing, it tells us of a city that has a better system of raising children that teaches them from kindergarten who to make friends with all races. If more school districts were like this we’d have less kids growing up to be racist because they learn that all people are born equal. The money in each household may be different, but money is not the mark of a good or bad human. Minorities would a better chance if the concept of inner city school mentality was gone.

By Alana Semuels

Hawthorne Elementary in Louisville, Kentucky, looks like what you might imagine a typical American suburban elementary school to be, with students’ art projects displayed in the hallways and brightly colored rugs and kid-sized tables and chairs in the classrooms. It’s located in a predominantly white neighborhood. But the students look different than those in many suburban schools across America. Some have dark skin, others wear headscarves, others are blonde and blue-eyed. While many of them qualify for free and reduced lunches, others bring handmade lunches in fancy thermal bags and come from well-off families.

Ever since a court forced them to integrate in the 1970s, the city of Louisville and surrounding Jefferson County have tried to maintain diverse schools.Louisville and Jefferson County have tried to maintain diverse schools. Though the region fought the integration at first, many residents and leaders came around to the idea, and even…

View original post 318 more words

Facing Challenges

challenges2Facing Challenges

by Daisaku Ikeda

Two African-American sisters, Sadie and Bessie Delaney, were born in the southern United States at the end of the nineteenth century.

Growing up, the sisters experienced great pain because of deep-rooted discrimination against people of African descent. They often shook with anger at the treatment they received. But they refused to be defeated, learning to laugh off discrimination and encouraging each other not to despair. The sisters determined: If society isn’t going to accept us when we have the same ability as white people, then we’re just going to have to become even more capable. They drew strength from their father, who used to say, “Don’t ever give up. Remember, they can segregate you, but they can’t control your mind. Your mind’s still yours.” Through tireless effort, they gained places to study at Columbia University.

Sadie, the elder sister, became the first African-American to teach domestic science at High School level in New York City. Bessie, meanwhile, was only the second African-American woman licensed to practice dentistry there. They were not defeated by discrimination, poverty or criticism. They knocked back obstacles with the attitude, “What! Is that all?”

Bessie summed up her attitude, saying, “However you do it, you’ve just got to fight in this life . . . If there’s one thing you’ve got to hold on to, it’s the courage to fight!” Both sisters outlived their detractors, living to over 100 years old with a deep sense of achievement.

Many people think that it is only those born into fortunate circumstances who can succeed in life. Such people often feel that they, too, could have been successful, if only they had been blessed with this or that, or if only they weren’t hampered by the problems that trouble them now.

When I was young, I had a friend who excelled at everything and whom everyone admired. But recently I heard that he had ended up very unhappy, beset by illness and family problems. How could this happen to someone who had seemed so lucky in his youth? Maybe it was because, having been pampered from an early age, he never learned what hard work was, nor what it meant to struggle to achieve something. Thinking that everything he needed would fall into his lap, he probably avoided making strenuous efforts and was therefore unable to withstand the waves of difficulties which hit him later in life.

As long as we are alive we cannot be free of difficulties nor spared from problems. The question is how to overcome and resolve them. And there is only one answer: to confront and challenge life’s trials head on. In doing so, we can actually change them into sources of joy. Hardship builds character. I firmly believe that one can never become a person of extraordinary character just by leading an ordinary and peaceful life and avoiding difficulties.

Life involves scaling one mountain, then the next, then the one after that. The person who keeps on going, one step at a time, and finally conquers the highest mountain, will have a real sense of victory in life. But someone who avoids challenges and takes the easy route instead, will gradually descend into the valleys and feel no such sense of satisfaction.

Such a person, when faced with a problem, tends to think, “I know I should take action, but it will be very difficult.” When it is time to act, this kind of person tends to turn away. Someone who perseveres will rise to the challenge, however, determining, “It will be very difficult, but I must take action.”

A dear friend who faced every challenge in her life was Mrs. Fang Zhaoling, a painter and calligrapher based in Hong Kong who passed away in 2006 at the age of 92. She grew up during great political instability in China and her father was gunned down before her when she was eleven years old. But her mother was determined not to let this tragedy stand in the way of her daughter’s education, and Mrs. Fang studied hard, also learning to paint.

She married young and bore eight children. Then tragedy struck again when she was 36. Her husband died, leaving her to bring up the children—aged between 3 and 11—alone. Mrs. Fang then ran a small trading company and somehow managed to support and raise her children and provide each of them with a good education. She said, “Experiencing the hardship of being widowed at a young age is perhaps what gave me the strength to go on to study and develop my skill as an artist.”

Her life was evidence that overcoming challenges, triumphing over adversity is what life is all about. Her paintings often show steep cliffs and forbidding crags, but often one can make out a path or road through the rocks. Even in her eighties, Mrs. Fang was always active, always moving forwards. Her life shone like a jewel, forged and polished by hardship. A diamond, the king of jewels, is the hardest and brightest of minerals. Just as diamonds crystallize when carbon buried deep underground is subjected to extremely high pressure and temperatures, so, when we forge our lives under the intense pressure of difficulties and in the severe heat of hardship, we can develop a beautiful and strong sense of self.

Often the biggest obstacle in meeting life’s challenges is actually our own fear of failure. But it is not failure that we should fear. The only real failure comes when we allow our fear to prevent us from taking on new and unknown challenges.

Just about every important figure in history has in fact lived a life marked by one mishap after another. But these individuals rose up again after every setback, prodded on by a spirit that refuses to concede defeat and relishes challenge, to eventually crown their lives with victory.

Even if you have problems, even if you have done things you regret, or have made mistakes, your whole future still lies ahead of you. If you can just keep moving forward, telling yourself, “I’ll start from today,” “I’ll start afresh from now, from this moment,” then a whole new world of possibilities will open up before you.

Charles A. Kush III

Charles Kush - Executive, Management Consultant, Board Member, Operating Partner - Ecommerce, Digital Marketing, Internet Technology

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